The Interview

(originally published 30 January 2009)

I just sat for an interview this morning.

Last night, as I stayed for the night in my friend’s condo unit, my mind was already filled with questions about my future and about what I am to do with my life after, God willing, I get my medical license and become a full-fledged doctor. I wondered if the decision I made earlier that day would finally answer those.

There had been an intense urge, since that day began, to do something that will change my life forever. I eventually felt this urge being satisfied as I finally walked in the scholarships office and signified my intention to apply for a unique scholarship program.

Admittedly, half of me wanted the benefits. These times are tough times for me and my family. Petty quarrels have been becoming quite frequent at home, because of how that very precious wad of bills is being spent. I felt badly that I had to do something about it.

Initially, I did just that by entering a business venture with some fraternity brods. During the past months I had built a business of my own, which was grounded on the principles of free-enterprise and private franchising.

But, now, it seems to me that prospecting and showing business plans occupies too much space in my already complicated mind. My ideas and feelings about building a business may change in the future, but I really feel that I have to focus. Right now I wanted to fixate my mind on this objective: To study hard, and become the best doctor I can be for other people.

This time, I wanted to find a way to augment the family’s finances without having to lose my focus in becoming a dedicated physician. With this in mind, I finally applied for a scholarship grant that will take me to a far-flung area right after passing the medical boards.

Yesterday I had been told that the interview will start at 7, and found the day opportune to staying for the night at a nearby condo unit of a close friend. Just this morning I readied myself, imagining what questions will be asked and what expectations are to be met. I tried to answer each question sincerely and with heart.

I told them how much I would risk to serve my nation. As corny and as patriotic this may sound.

I told them how much I felt ready to be part in building the nation one rural health unit at a time.

And I told them, that in the future, I want to establish a medical practice that will make my family and friends proud.

Right after I sat for the interview, I called my parents and thankfully I heard from them how much they supported me for a decision I made on my own: to pledge two years or more of my life to serving the underserved. I have yet to discuss these personally, I am still here in an internet joint across the college, searching for experiences of people who have trodden this path ahead of me. Some reassuring, others even discouraging.

But all of them, heroic.

I know, I am not yet leaving for an island town or a barrio nestled in the middle of the Cordilleras. But it is quite a different feeling waking up early in the morning and doing one’s daily tasks in the hospital while thinking of the future two years that you will spend in the barrios.

I have been told that the slot will be secured once my parents give me their blessing.

I can’t wait to talk about it with them tonight.

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EPILOGUE: I did get assigned to the Cordilleras. I have been at times doubting my motivations, even to the point of questioning myself why I did this. But after reading this and looking at the pictures of the areas I’ve served, absolutely no regrets.

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