Getting fit: a health policy perspective

While on the train from Sunday service, I contended with a Facebook-induced self-insecurity. One of my friends had posted an article about a TV personality who lost 65 pounds in 90 days. With a shot of envy running down my spine, I clicked the link, wanting to know how he did it.

It turned out that his fitness journey wasn’t any ordinary resolve to lose weight. It took him two to three hours of daily exercise, with close monitoring from a personal trainer and a nutritionist.

Thinking about my personal fitness journey that I started recently, I thought to myself: how long would it take me to lose that amount of excess weight? As a man standing at 5 feet 10.5 inches, it would greatly benefit me to lose about that amount of weight to attain the ideal weight for my height and age. Feel free to do the math what my ideal weight should be.

But, from a public health perspective, with a rising percentage of Filipinos (and other Southeast Asians) becoming overweight, the promotion of healthy lifestyles is becoming increasingly important in this part of the world.

Interestingly, a tactic that health clubs and gyms usually do to promote their facilities is to point out that hindrances to maintaining a healthy diet and a regular exercise regimen are mere excuses. It actually works well in a country where this maxim is well-followed: “Kung gusto, may paraan; kung ayaw, may dahilan.” A loose translation of this is “If one sets out to do something seriously, he will find a way, despite difficulties. If one refuses to exert the effort, he will always have excuses.”

Most of the time, however, a lot of these excuses are valid.

For instance, middle-aged workers and professionals would usually be unable to keep to a regular exercise regimen because of long commutes to and from one’s workplace, the need to take care of one’s family, or the need to periodically accept overtime work or side jobs to augment one’s meagre income.

Another perspective is food choices, where usually, low-fat, organic or other healthy lifestyle-friendly options are more costly than ordinary, fat-rich variants.

Yet another concern would be the difficulty in using sidewalks and roads for jogging or running, due to their poor condition, or the risk of being mugged.

It is unfortunate that regular folks like you and me are faced with these obstacles that, if surmounted, would enable more people to pursue healthier lifestyles. Though individually, people may choose to adopt healthy lifestyles, these efforts would be largely influenced by how well they earn, and how much time they have in their hands. Using public health-speak, as with any other public health concern, healthy lifestyle promotion is also heavily influenced by social determinants of health: the social, cultural, economic and political context in which people live and work.

I believe that healthy lifestyle promotion is a moral obligation for ministries of health, and that this needs to be closely tied with workplaces, which may assign specific days for physical activities, or put up facilities where employees can engage in physical activities.

Equally important is the need to coordinate efforts with public works and law enforcement, in order to design and monitor roads, thoroughfares and public spaces with healthy lifestyle promotion in mind; that these spaces be walkable and safe, and that people can run on them and organize group exercise activities with them.

Maybe soon, with all the social determinants impeding healthy lifestyle promotion addressed, we may all be able to attain our respective ideal weights, or even the figure we like, without the need to spend all the money that that TV personality might have spent, just to lose 65 pounds in 90 days.

In conclusion, despite current difficulties, healthy lifestyle is still an individual choice. But in the interest of public health, if we want more people living longer, healthier lives, governments and health agencies should not just promote a healthier lifestyle, but facilitate it as well.

Read more:

Friel S, Hatterly L, Ford L. (2015). Evidence review: addressing the social determinants of inequities in healthy eating. Carlton South, Victoria, Australia: VicHealth. Retrieved from: https://goo.gl/wNioC7

Villaverde M, Vergeire R, De Los Santos M. (2012). Health promotion and non-communicable diseases in the Philippines. Quezon City, Philippines: Ateneo de Manila University. Retrieved from: https://goo.gl/07SyGo

 

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